Culture Herd We Hunt – You Gather

Welcome

This sites content production happens in random spurts When I have time and can convince other artists into talking and/or working with me. I make no apology for it's infrequency as I'm probably making other cool things happen. I'M ONLY ONE MAN... who loves artists and writes articles and interviews about their lives.

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Survivor – Roy Powell

"Survivors" is an interview series highlighting artists that maintain a "day job" to pay the bills. To shed some light on the techniques and methods of coping and succeeding as an artist. But also bring us all a bit closer by showing we all share the same struggles and challenges.

I came to know Roy through a collaborative series he built with Greg Boudreau called "Chief Seattle's All Stars" But he's no "one trick pony" (at least when it comes to art) He paints, prints and survives day to day with the duality of a super hero but without all that super power "baggage". Be sure to see all his art: www.roypowellart.com

Mayor SchellWilliam Boeing 2010 Spray paint on linenPaul Allen 2010 Spray Paint on Linen

The Questions...

1. What (other than art) do you do to pay the bills?

    I work for a copier sales company in the sales support dept.

2. What else would you do for money?

    Almost Anything...

3. What's the hardest part of having a day job while you build an art career?

    The hardest part is the time comitment. I spend a lot of time at my day job knowing that I could be painting or printmaking right now instead of reminding a customer how to replace their toner cartridge for the 3rd time in a week.

4. Have you ever gotten in trouble at your day job for promoting your art?

    Not yet. I've moved painting into my office / cube. I've handed out some flyers. Most of the time these "business types" can't be bothered with anything related to art. But if It were an invitation to a fantasy football league or the like, they would be all over it.

5. What would you say departing your day job for the last time?

    Thank you for the oppertunity to delay my goals and dreams in exchange for a steady paycheck and health benifits. That's pretty passive aggressive. I probably wouldn't say that.

6. Hours per week at your day job?

    40.

7. Hours per week making art?

    20-35 depending on the week.

8. Who are the people in your neighborhood?

    Capital Hill types.

9. What's the least amount of sleep (hours) that you need to get through a busy day?

    4, sometimes 3. 4 each night if I'm going to be not sleeping very much for multiple nights in a row.

10. Please list the following items in order of "most-neglected" to "most-attended".
(Sleep, Food, Sex, Art, Day Job, Friends, Health, Bills, Mom)

    Health, Mom, Bills, Day Job, Friends, Sleep, Sex, Art, Food.

11. How did you end up in your day job?

    I responded to a Craigslist add. I wanted to get out of my job at a paint store (not as glamourous as you'd think) so bad, that I took the first job I was offered.

12. How would you measure the amount of success needed to quit your day job?

    I would need  a lot of success. With rent and bills, I'm not quiting anytime soon.

13. If your art was an animal, what would it be?

    Slow lorris. Just kidding, my work isn't that cute, I just like saying Slow Lorris. Umm, nope, I'm going to stick with Slow Lorris.

14. Where can people find your art online?

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Survivor: Chris Sheridan

"Survivors" is an interview series highlighting artists that maintain a "day job" to pay the bills. To shed some light on the techniques and methods of coping and succeeding as an artist. But also bring us all a bit closer by showing we all share the same struggles and challenges.

Chris is  a shining example of what you can accomplish if you harness the power of ADHD to master multitasking. He's also tireless Artwalk Presenter and Pioneer Square Patriot. In an earthquake, he'd run to try and hold the crack in the 619 building together without a thought for his own safety. Actually, he'd probably find a way to multitask while he was doing it. Maybe call and check in on Kate or hand a fleeing patron one of his flyers.

His insight below ranges in topic from VooDoo dolls to fancy fanny packs. But what you really need to know about him is that his studio is in the middle of the 619 western building and he (in my eyes) is the hub of what's great about the pioneer square artwalk.

1. What (other than art) do you do to pay the bills?

    I have voodoo dolls of all of my creditors, I give them “money” and the big guys think we’re good; wouldn’t that be rad? Gumption, it’s all about gumption. There are a ton of things you can do to pay the bills, and things you can trade to save money for bills. I build shipping crates for people, do freelance art installation, sell things I don’t really need (although I really miss my kayaks—a lot—suck it I.R.S.), and I often lend a helping hand to peeps in my studio building for a burger and a beer, thus saving greenbacks for the man. I’m also a “manny.” A “manny” you say?” Yes. The kids weren’t really feeling the Mary Poppins things when I showed up, so they call me the “manny.”

2. What else would you do for money?

    Be awesome, I don’t know, anything really; perhaps not anything, but close. Hell I’d play the double for Chuck Norris’ chin if I had too. On a serious note though, a lot of artists do graphic design, web design, T-shirt design, design-design, etc; I’ve discovered pressing and shaping long board skateboards by hand. It’s really gratifying to make tangible things, even more so when a good friend steps on something you made and bombs a hill with you. I wouldn’t mind making money doing that. Truth be told, I actually like the woodworking better than the painting, but don’t tell painting, she’s really sensitive sometimes; but that might just be because the wood lets me manipulate it, whereas the paint and I tend to manipulate each other. Guess I have control issues. So money, yes, I’ll do things for money.

3. What's the hardest part of having a day job while you build an art career?

    The fact that it all takes time. Art is a full time job, marketing your art is a full time job, cataloging your art is a full time job, attending art shows (both yours and others) is a full time job, finding ways to create and sustain name recognition is a full time job…and although I only work my “day job” part time, it finds a way of creating interesting time dynamics with all my other full time jobs.

4. Have you ever gotten in trouble at your day job for promoting your art?

    Yup who hasn’t? As with most things, sometimes a conflict is going to arise and you have to make a decision and take responsibility for your actions. It can be tough being a manny. It’s not like you can call in sick and a coworker shows up and shuttles the kids to one of the many activities for the day; it’s you, or kids sans activities. At the end of the day though, the whole manny thing is what allows me to continue being an artist, not vice versa; and I’m lucky enough to have a real flexible gig on most occasions.

5. What would you say departing your day job for the last time?

    Ah yah, so do you think I could get a ride home?

6. Hours per week at your day job?

    Roughly 20 give or take.

7. Hours per week making art?

    It depends. From the end of July to December I was averaging 70 – 80, but I’ve only been in there a few days since the first week of December. After the new year begins, I have a lot of shows lined up including a big solo show in D.C. in June, so the studio and I will be as one. We’re going to have to come up with some Mr. Miyagi wax-on-wax off juju to keep us both sane.

8. Who are the people in your neighborhood?

    Well I live in Alki, so there are all sorts of people. Some of the stand outs: 1. Opalescent green, ridiculously large tires, white rag top, hydraulics, 68 Impala, gang banger guy. 2. Crazy over-excited, up with people, gum smacking, talks so loud on the celly one thinks perhaps she had a bull horn implanted in her throat, P.D.A. (get a room level) with costumed pug lady. 3. By far my fave from the other day, bundled up like an arctic explorer on top yet short wearing, three pairs of multicolored wool socks, bright yellow crocs with a single yaktrax installed on one foot (for those not privy, yaktrax are like snow chains for your feet), old yellow lab walker lady. 4. Almost forgot really expensive running shoes, really expensive running shirt, really expensive running glasses, fancy fanny pack water bottle holder with really expensive running aide drink mix stuff, dolphin shorts, free ballin’, sweating profusely, big gut, out of shape, boardwalk runner guy.

9. What's the least amount of sleep (hours) that you need to get through a busy day?

    I’m getting old, so I need more and more all the time. But if the deadline calls for it, a couple.

10. Please list the following items in order of "most-neglected" to "most-attended".
Sleep, Food, Sex, Art, Day Job, Friends, Health, Bills, Mom

    Today it looks like this: Health, food, art, friends, sex, mom, day job, bills.
    Last Monday it was: Bills, sex, sleep, friends, health, food, day job, art.
    At the beginning of Sept it was: Art and that’s about it.

11. How did you end up in your day job?

    I spent a lot of years trying to work jobs that I thought would allow me to come home and paint: art stores, ice cream shops, art handling, galleries, even art chop shops; and when I got home, the last thing in the world I wanted to or had time to do was paint. At the time, I was working at a really high end gallery on the Upper East Side in NY. It was the type of job where I’d show up and a Dürer would be on my desk waiting for me to re-frame it, where one day I found a Picasso test print on onion skin paper that the Met never knew existed (and quickly bought), where I wasn’t allowed to hire anyone to help me move 700lbs of Frankenthaler madness from Connecticut to NYC, to Connecticut, and to NYC again. Thought for sure all the inspiration around me would create an abundance of art, but between the hours I worked and the damn commuter train from Brooklyn to the city, it didn’t happen. One day I was on the commuter train—you have to keep in mind these trains were so full it was possible to travel 5 or 6 stops with out your feet actually touching the ground—and I got off at the Lex and 53rd stop and started the rush up the escalators. Now being commuter train savvy, you know there are unspoken rules: where to stand in the train, where to walk, where to run, where not to stop and talk on the phone, which end of the platform to stand at to guarantee the fastest route to the stairs, and especially which side of the escalator to stand on and which side you run. I had become such a drone that the day a lady was standing on the wrong side of the escalator with a suitcase (you see, regular folk stand on the right, the “important” people know enough that the only way to make the connecting 6 train is to run up the left side) I proceeded to scream in her face about how much of an idiot she was. That was it. I enjoyed NY, but it had turned my soul black, I was angry, I was unrecognizable to my old friends, and I had no art to show for it. It was time to leave. I quit a month later and headed to Seattle ‘cause I had never been there before, and Kate had a sister there; she offered me the manny gig so I could get back into making art. And I did.

12. How would you measure the amount of success needed to quit your day job?

    By having enough success to not have to have my day job.

13. If your art was an animal, what would it be?

    A human child: it makes leaps and bounds in its abilities, has a knack for figuring out things, even a strong personality, gumption, and desire, but it has a long road of learning ahead of it.

14. Where can people find your art online?

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Survivor: Eric Nelson

"Survivors" is an interview series highlighting artists that maintain a "day job" to pay the bills. To shed some light on the techniques and methods of coping and succeeding as an artist. But also bring us all a bit closer by showing we all share the same struggles and challenges.

Eric likes to have fun. His work in graphic design shows it, but he's still very practical. One of those right/left brain savants that's somehow normal enough to get by without anyone realizing he's a genius. For instance he likes professional sports AND the arts: who does that? Many friends of mine are graphic designers or developers (ok me too) and it's always interesting to see how creative professionals find the inspiration to be creative for themselves too.

1. What (other than art) do you do to pay the bills?

  • Nothing anymore (Graphic Designer/Developer)

2. What else would you do for money?

  • I used to coach volleyball. Now I'm 100% design and develop

3. What's the hardest part of having a day job while you build an art career?

  • All of the time that I lose during the day

4. Have you ever gotten in trouble at your day job for promoting your art?

  • Nope: They're very supportive

5. What would you say departing your day job for the last time?

  • Thanks for everything. I'll try to remember you when I'm famous

6. Hours per week at your day job?

  • 40

7. Hours per week making art?

  • Currently I have no room for art because I am starting a company outside of my day job

8. Who are the people in your neighborhood?

  • Younger people my age: 25-35

9. What's the least amount of sleep (hours) that you need to get through a busy day?

  • 6 hrs

10. Please list the following items in order of "most-neglected" to "most-attended".
Sleep, Food, Sex, Art, Day Job, Friends, Health, Bills, Mom

  • Sex, Art, Mom, Friends, Food, Health, Sleep, Day Job, Bills

11. How did you end up in your day job?

  • Coworker at an old job introduced me to the company

12. How would you measure the amount of success needed to quit your day job?

  • 100% financial. Once I can pay all my bills and have a reasonable lifestyle, I am out

13. If your art was an animal, what would it be?

  • Right now it would be roadkill because I have not painted in over a year. In its prime, it was a chameleon ink blot test. It turned into whatever it wanted to be and the viewer saw whatever they wanted to see in it.

14. Where can people find your art online?

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Survivor: Kristi Tamcsin

"Survivors" is an interview series highlighting artists that maintain a "day job" to pay the bills. To shed some light on the techniques and methods of coping and succeeding as an artist. But also bring us all a bit closer by showing we all share the same struggles and challenges.

Kristi (or Cookie as her friends know her) and her husband Geoffrey are one of those artist couples that seem to balance each other in every part of their lives. Geoffrey Purchased Plasteel Frames (a shop he worked in  for years) right around the same time they got some "big news". Now with their new son Hudson, they've had to switch gear and re-tool their lifestyles. She is most definitely a survivor.  Here's her answers: Listen Up Kids.

1. What (other than art) do you do to pay the bills?

  • Teach Yoga & Nanny kids

2. What else would you do for money?

  • Teach art

3. What's the hardest part of having a day job while you build an art career?

  • Having the energy after work to make art and dinner

4. Have you ever gotten in trouble at your day job for promoting your art?

  • Nope

5. What would you say departing your day job for the last time?

  • Chow Suckers! No, just to the kids... Just kidding ;)

6. Hours per week at your day job?

  • Before I had a baby which is (now) 24/7, I worked 30(ish) hours

7. Hours per week making art?

  • Anywhere from 0 - 12

8. Who are the people in your neighborhood?

  • Business folk, shoppers, store owners and bums

9. What's the least amount of sleep (hours) that you need to get through a busy day?

  • Before my baby I'd say 8, now I say 6

10. Please list the following items in order of "most-neglected" to "most-attended".
---> Sleep, Food, Sex, Art, Day Job, Friends, Health, Bills, Mom

  • Food, Friends, Mom, Health, Sex, Sleep, Bills, Art & Day Job: Baby

11. How did you end up in your day job?

  • Not having enough money to make a working portfolio and pay the bills

12. How would you measure the amount of success needed to quit your day job?

  • Enough money to pay the rent and bills and have extra to live on

13. If your art was an animal, what would it be?

  • An owl.

14. Where can people find your art online?

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Survivor: Greg Boudreau

"Survivors" is an interview series highlighting artists that maintain a "day job" to pay the bills. To shed some light on the techniques and methods of coping and succeeding as an artist. But also bring us all a bit closer by showing we all share the same struggles and challenges.

Greg Boudreau is a name with more vowels than enemies. He's hard not to like. A character trait that I'm sure plays a large part in his continued success. His work is a bit urban, a bit industrial and a lot chic. His stencils can be found in corporate lobbies, private homes and art galleries from Seattle to Texas and back.

We lost him to LA for a few years but we're glad to have his work adorning the walls of Seattles highest profile art venues. He's a regular at artwalks in Pioneer Sq so look for him when you're down there. Greg himself is humble and a bit shy but his work is bold and sharply expressive. Not to be missed on any day.

1. What (other than art) do you do to pay the bills?

  • Property management (aka posting apartment ads on craigslist) and some graphic design work here and there.

2. What else would you do for money?

  • I’d really like to start an escargot farm.

3. What's the hardest part of having a day job while you build an art career?

  • Interruptions. Every time I leave the studio it seems to take more than twice the amount of time to return. I tend to calculate time away with paintings not being made.

4. Have you ever gotten in trouble at your day job for promoting your art?

  • No, but I do think that my shortcomings are somehow explained by being good at art. Don’t ask me for the logic behind that.

5. What would you say departing your day job for the last time?

  • Probably just a goodbye and see you around... I doubt I would be leaving on bad terms.

6. Hours per week at your day job?

  • 10-15 hrs

7. Hours per week making art?

  • 40-80 hrs

8. Who are the people in your neighborhood?

  • Artists or businesses? I’m on 11th Ave between Pike and Pine. On just our block there’s Grim’s, Barca, Vermillion, Value Village, Annex Theater, Healthy Times Fun Club, Purr, The Crpyt, and about twenty or so artists in the warehouse lofts where I work.

9. What's the least amount of sleep (hours) that you need to get through a busy day?

  • I’ve done days where I haven’t gone to sleep at all and then installed three shows. I do feel that just 1 to 2 hours then getting up, showering, cleaning up yourself, and having some coffee is a brilliant way to trick yourself into feeling more rested than you are. Ideally I’d just go for 4-6 hours a night. 6 is the most sustainable. If I have 8 hours or more it slows me down.

10. Please list the following items in order of "most-neglected" to "most-attended".
Sleep, Food, Sex, Art, Day Job, Friends, Health, Bills, Mom

  • Bills, Day Job, Sleep, Health, Mom, Friends, Sex, Food, Art

11. How did you end up in your day job?

  • I help manage apartments for a family friend. Someone left the office and he needed some help. And I hadn’t been selling as many paintings at the moment and needed the money.

12. How would you measure the amount of success needed to quit your day job?

  • Hmmm, it’s tough to say. Currently my job is not taking up too much of my time. I’d have to have a single sustained project under constrained circumstances that would force me to quit. I’m not quite looking to drop the job at the moment.

13. If your art was an animal, what would it be?

  • Much like my Harry Potter Patronus, I’d like it to be a lion but it’d probably be a squirrel.

14. Where can people find your art online?

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Survivor: Michael Pomerleau

"Survivors" is an interview series highlighting artists that maintain a "day job" to pay the bills. To shed some light on the techniques and methods of coping and succeeding as an artist. But also bring us all a bit closer by showing we all share the same struggles and challenges.

Mikes last name (Pomerleau) literally means Apple Water and yes... the family business was moonshine. Mikes intoxication doesn't come from booz though (well that's not always true) it comes from Painting. Sure he designs toy packaging for huge corporations but if you knew him you'd say hes more Monet than Mattel. Hes a honest, focused, and inspiring force in anything he signs up for, including this website. His paintings have sold from Boston to Seattle and hes the most driven dude I've met, ever.

1. What (other than art) do you do to pay the bills?

  • Self-employed Graphic Designer.

2. What else would you do for money?

  • Anything really, but probably not Bar-tending or Waiting Tables. I learned early on that I'm a complete train-wreck when it comes to memorizing food and drink orders. I'd starve before making a decent tip ...

3. What's the hardest part of having a day job while you build an art career?

  • Focusing on one while thinking about the other.

4. Have you ever gotten in trouble at your day job for promoting your art?

  • Nope.

5. What would you say departing your day job for the last time?

  • "Thank You".

6. Hours per week at your day job?

  • Anywhere from 5 - 85

7. Hours per week making art?

  • 5 - 40 Depends on how much work I have.

8. Who are the people in your neighborhood?

  • Working professionals of Lower Queen Anne

8. What's the least amount of sleep (hours) that you need to get through a busy day?

  • Two hours

9. Please list the following items in order of MOST neglected to most attended.
Sleep, Food, Sex, Art, Day Job, Friends, Health, Bills, Mom

  • Mom, Sleep, Health, Food, Sex, Bills, Friends, Art, Job

10. How did you end up in your day job?

  • Graphic Design is pretty much the only thing I've ever done for work since I was 16.

11. How would you measure the amount of success needed to quit your day job?

  • I don't think it's a matter of success needed, but rather, a solid plan with complete and dedicated focus.
    Let's face it, what's the difference between selling Oranges and Artwork? Your emotional connection to the product?

12. If your art was an animal, what would it be?

  • A monkey with a conscience.

12. Where can people find your art online?

  • Believe it or not, Mike has no current work online... we should change that.
  • Mikes musings on art can be found in this publication though Click here for his latest
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Survivor: Jessica Day

"Survivors" is an interview series highlighting artists that maintain a "day job" to pay the bills. To shed some light on the techniques and methods of coping and succeeding as an artist. But also bring us all a bit closer by showing we all share the same struggles and challenges.

Jessica Day is a prolific writer, tireless non profit board member, and avid patron of the arts. She holds a BA in English from one side of the country and a Masters in Fine Arts from the other. Her work is loaded with hilarity and laced with humanity. I recommend that you take a minute of your day and read some of her work, then go get a tattoo with her name on it... cause she's that good.

1. What (other than art) do you do to pay the bills?

  • I freelance write for a market research blog and I work a 9-5 as a marketing coordinator for a marketing firm.

2. What else would you do for money?

  • I would love to teach - preferably creative writing - preferably to college students. I have also always thought that being a film critic would be one of the most savory jobs out there. Or, you know, a florist.

3. What's the hardest part of having a day job while you build an art career?

  • I think balance is one of the most difficult things to maintain between a survivable day job and your commitment to being an artist. You always have to borrow from some part of your life to make time for everything and sleep and a personal life are usually the first things to go. If you give any part of yourself to something else - like freelance work, volunteering, or more, you have to borrow further. Prioritization, it seems, is key. And also very difficult.

4. Have you ever gotten in trouble at your day job for promoting your art?

  • No - but I probably should have. Oh office copier... please continue to keep your secret safe.

5. What would you say departing your day job for the last time?

  • "Thanks"

6. Hours per week at your day job?

  • 40-50

7. Hours per week making art?

  • 10-20

8. What's the least amount of sleep (hours) that you need to get through a busy day?

  • I need sleep. I lust after sleep. I need a minimum six hours. "What do they call those people who don't need sleep? Oh yeah... successful" ~Jim Gaffigan

9. Please list the following items in order of MOST neglected to most attended.
Sleep, Food, Sex, Art, Day Job, Friends, Health, Bills, Mom

  • Health, Mom, Bills, Friends, Sleep, Art, Day Job, Sex & then Food

10. How did you end up in your day job?

  • I was hired because I had a professional connection to my then-boss. And somehow, I miraculously survived the layoffs through that recession. And here I am... keeping my health insurance.

11. How would you measure the amount of success needed to quit your day job?

  • Just enough money to get by for six months - enough to pay the rent, the student debt, insurance, the groceries. It's not an impossible number. My savings awaits that magical day. After that, the novel and movie adaptation should take care of me.

12. If your art was an animal, what would it be?

  • An otter... or possibly a goat.

12. Who are the people in your neighborhood?

  • I live in Wedgwood. This means that my neighbors are the lovely scooter-renting lesbian couple and the wholesome family with a stay-at-home Mom and a husband who works at T-Mobile. Is that what you meant?

12. Where can people find your art online?

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Survivor: Jon Peck

"Survivors" is an interview series highlighting artists that maintain a "day job" to pay the bills. To shed some light on the techniques and methods of coping and succeeding as an artist. But also bring us all a bit closer by showing we all share the same struggles and challenges.

Jon Peck spends his time playing with computers and swords and gets paid for both. He's a mild mannered computer professional by day and the consummate choreographer of fighting and acrobatics by night. It's a dichotomy most would find peculiar yet somehow very understandable, just keep the swords away from the monitor Samurai Peckson. And thanks for answering my questions!

1. What (other than art) do you do to pay the bills?

  • I have a degree in computer science, and the majority of my income comes from three sources right now: I create research-oriented software and websites for a Boston-based nonprofit hospital, I teach software development classes for a local community college, and I also work as an independent consultant for anyone who needs a website or custom software (mostly artists and nonprofits, when possible).

2. What else would you do for money?

  • I would do -- and have done -- a variety of paid arts-related work, from choreographing stage fights to acting as a Halloween tour guide. I'm increasingly trying to move behind the camera, nd have recently been filming and editing corporate videos

3. What's the hardest part of having a day job while you build an art career?

  • When you work independently, as I do, you get very good at juggling multiple tasks and make a habit of prioritizing your
    highest-paid and highest-profile jobs first. Artistic endeavors are almost always last on these lists: we don't get paid much, if at all, for the work we most love...and we're lucky if we touch more than a few hundred people with any one piece. My biggest problem, right now, is remembering to set aside a separate time and space for my own art, regardless of its economic or self-promotional value.

4. Have you ever gotten in trouble at your day job for promoting your art?

  • My primary employer is amazingly understanding, and my independent clients don't see or care about the specifics of how I allocate my time, so long as i get the job done.

5. What would you say departing your day job for the last time?

  • Let's keep in touch; I'm always available if you need my help or advice in the future.

6. Hours per week at your day job?

  • 30-50

7. Hours per week making art?

  • 20-30

8. What's the least amount of sleep (hours) that you need to get through a busy day?

  • I can survive on 5 hours for one or two nights running, but prefer 6-7 on a regular basis. I'm rarely able to sleep more than 8 hours at once (unless I've been up for several days straight).

9. Please list the following items in order of MOST neglected to most attended.
Sleep, Food, Sex, Art, Day Job, Friends, Health, Bills, Mom

  • Sleep, Health, Mom, Food, Friends, Art, Day Job, Sex, Bills (wow, you wouldn't think a simple question could be so revealing)

10. How did you end up in your day job?

  • Instead of just quitting my job and trying to find another, I sat down for a chat with my boss. We decided that it would be more cost-effective for him to keep me on as a telecommuter than it would be to train a new employee. If not for this instant -- a particular combination of the flexible nature of my work, my refusal to follow the mainstream path, and my manager's open-mindedness -- I wouldn't be
    able to do most of what I do now.

11. How would you measure the amount of success needed to quit your day job?

  • I'd be able to quit my job when the work I can expect to get from them, on a regular bases, exceeds my minimum income requirement by about 30% (it's good to have a buffer). Of course, given the nature of my day job, I might stay on but just cut down on my hours, if possible.

12. If your art was an animal, what would it be?

  • Yeast isn't technically an animal, but I'm running with it anyway: my art starts small but grows quickly, and builds a diverse set of products from the same base ingredients.... like beer, it can be intoxicating; like handmade bread, it can be rough around the edges but hearty on the inside; and, occasionally, it falls completely flat and needs to be baked again from scratch.

12. Who are the people in your neighborhood?

  • Neighborhood is an abstract term. Physically, I'm near a few other artists (Jessica Day & Aaron Samuels are just a few blocks away), but the virtual neighborhood I live in goes way beyond Wedgwood (Social Networking). Mentally, I think of my neighborhoods as "the stage fight community", "the film/video club", "the live-theatre peeps", and so on -- and I'm excited when I see people from one of these neighborhoods wander into another.

12. Where can people find your art online?

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • Delicious
  • MySpace
  • Share/Bookmark
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Survivor: Carrie Purcell

"Survivors" is an interview series highlighting artists that maintain a "day job" to pay the bills. To shed some light on the techniques and methods of coping and succeeding as an artist. But also bring us all a bit closer by showing we all share the same struggles and challenges.

Carrie Purcell Is a Writer, Non Profit Board Member, Musician, and holds an M.F.A. from the University of Washington. She lives in Seattle and is currently completing a manuscript of poems based on diagnosis codes. She's a motivated individual capable of anything she puts her mind to and I have little doubt that she will succeed beyond that which she has already seen.

1. What (other than art) do you do to pay the bills?

  • I nanny and teach piano.

2. What else would you do for money?

  • I have in the past done administrative work, house sat, cat sat,
    temped, and worked retail.  Currently, I'm willing to do whatever pays
    well enough to allow me to work part time and that I don't find
    morally reprehensible.

3. What's the hardest part of having a day job while you build an art career?

  • Never having enough time to do what needs to be done or not having
    enough money to participate in the events I'd like to (conferences,
    writing retreats, readings that cost money etc.)

4. Have you ever gotten in trouble at your day job for promoting your art?

  • No.  My employers have always been supportive of my art and usually
    try to make it to my events.

5. What would you say departing your day job for the last time?

  • Thank You!

6. Hours per week at your day job?

  • 25-30

7. Hours per week making art?

  • 25-35

8. What's the least amount of sleep (hours) that you need to get through a busy day?

  • Sleep? Who needs that?  The question is how much coffee do you need to
    get through a busy day.  7 hours=one mug of tea.  6 hours=one 12oz
    drip. 5 or less=16oz drip in the morning, 12-16oz americano in the
    afternoon.

9. Please list the following items in order of MOST neglected to most attended.
Sleep, Food, Sex, Art, Day Job, Friends, Health, Bills, Mom

  • Sleep, food, my mother, parties, my friends, my art, and then my day job

10. How did you end up in your day job?

  • Analysis of what jobs pay the most for part-time work that doesn't
    drive me batty.

11. How would you measure the amount of success needed to quit your day job?

  • By the amount of money I earn from a different, more writing-oriented, day job.

12. Where can people find your art online?


  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • Delicious
  • MySpace
  • Share/Bookmark
Filed under: Survivors 1 Comment
   

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